DSN and NDR report types

Last updated: 2020-03-01

Exchange Server 2013Exchange Server 2016Exchange Server 2019Exchange and other MTAs use DSNs (Delivery Status Notifications) and NDRs (Non-Delivery Reports) to notify the sender or sending MTAs (Message Transfer Agents aka Mail Servers) about the various statuses of a given email message. In Exchange, those messages are generated primarily by the categorizer component of the transport service.

You can use the New-SystemMessage cmdlet to create new messages. These messages can even be localized and can contain Html tags for properly styled notifications.

From a system perspective, the various notifications used are named and fulfill a specific purpose.

 

Report and receipt types (Exchange Version independent) used for notification

  • Delivery Receipt (DR)
    A report confirming that a message was delivered to its intended recipient
  • Delivery Status Notification (DSN)
    A report describing the result of an attempt to deliver a message

  • Message Disposition Notification (MDN)
    A report describing the status of a message after it has been successfully delivered to a recipient. Examples: read notification (RN) or non-read notification (NRN)
    Defined by RFC 2298 and controlled by Disposition-Notification-To header

  • Non-Delivery Report (NDR)
    A report indicating to the message sender that the message could not be delivered to the intended recipients

  • Non-Read Notification (NRN)
    A report indicating that a message was deleted before it was read when a read receipt was requested

  • Out Of Office/Facility (OOF)
    A report indicating that the recipient will not respond to a new message
    OOF refers to the Microsoft original term „out of facility

  • Read Notification (RN)
    A report indicating that a message was read

  • Recall Report (RR)
    A report indicating the status of a recall request for a specific recipient
    A recall request is used when a sender tries to recall a sent message by using Outlook

Links

 


This post has first been published in my personal blog here.

 

 

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